How should I pose for my image capture?

Our carefully calibrated array of cameras “capture” a cylinder shaped area one meter across by two meters high (a little more than three feet across by a little over 6 feet high). Almost any pose you want to strike inside that virtual space is alright – be creative and have fun! We will take several shots and you can choose the one you like the best. Try to think in 3-D – what would make this interesting on a coffee table looked at from all sides rather than just on a shelf. Please keep in mind that details like fine strands of hair or spread fingers may not print well or might break off the print too easily.

What are the Stax 3D Studio Full Body Scans made of?

The replicas are printed with the world’s most sophisticated multi-color 3D printing technology. They are made of a high performance coated composite of gypsum powder, coloring and a glue-like binder material.

Are they fragile?

Think of the photo-realistic, full color statue as a work of porcelain art you want to treat carefully. Your Stax 3D Full Body Scan has been treated with a special coating to protect it and keep it healthy for a long time. However, thin parts like ears or fingers can be broken off if they fall. The surface or coloring can be harmed by water, high humidity, direct sunlight or heat over 140 F.

How long will it take for me to get my Stax 3D Full Body Scan?

Our carefully calibrated array of cameras “capture” a cylinder shaped area one meter across by two meters high (a little more than three feet across by a little over 6 feet high). Almost any pose you want to strike inside that virtual space is alright – be creative and have fun! We will take several shots and you can choose the one you like the best. Try to think in 3-D – what would make this interesting on a coffee table looked at from all sides rather than just on a shelf. Please keep in mind that details like fine strands of hair or spread fingers may not print well or might break off the print too easily.

3D Modeling. Is it just for Rocket Scientists?

Nope. It used to be but has now become easier and easier for anyone to use. I happen to have a rocket scientist on hand to prove this theory…For example, jump onto the free site www.tinkercad.com and you can start 3D modeling in a matter of minutes (or seconds if you’re one of those “go-getter” types).

SLA?

Stereolithography Apparatus. A cured resin system whereby a laser emits light that hardens the resin into a specific shape or design. There are a couple of different methods by which to accomplish this.

FDM?

Fused Deposition Modeling. Thermoplastic wire is fed into a heating device which melts the plastic and extrudes it from a nozzle onto a build platform. It is then built up layer by layer (in STAX, see what we did there…)until you have your final product. ​

What is 3D printing? Really, it sounds crazy

Yes, we are moving into the age of Jetsons (we’re pretty sure this will become the historically referenced title for the era). Through FDM or SLA (the two most common) you can now produce items at home or work that you would have to have typically purchased or sent off to a production house.